101 West Gordon

The Pixel Painter

Just. Wow. Great film. Even better subject. Thank you to the Laskos for sharing.

(Source: vimeo.com)

blakegopnik:

DAILY PIC:  These are tight croppings from “Doors, Ponte City” and “Windows, Ponte City”, by Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse, now in   the International Center of Photography’s latest triennial, which previewed today. Curators are calling the show “A Different Kind of Order” – referencing the collapsing verities of photographic art, and of the worlds it points to. The triennial gives an excellent overview of the vast range of “lens-based” work being made today, from “straight” views of people living with the world’s rising waters (by Gideon Mendel) to distinctly arty, hand-made objects that use photos as art supplies (by art-world regulars Wangechi Mutu and Huma Bhabha). In between are projects like “Ponte City”, which is based in photography’s ability to document the world but doesn’t simply take it for granted. Subotzky and Waterhouse made a close study of a residential tower in Johannesburg, designed for white South Africans under Apartheid but now occupied by the country’s majority, and they present their images as lightboxes that recreate, in miniature, the tower itself.
Other standouts in the show include A.K. Burns (with reperformances of ultra-esoteric YouTube porn) and Rabih Mroue (whose video about death-by-sniper was a gem of the last Documenta).For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive. The Daily Pic can also be found at the bottom of the home page of thedailybeast.com, and on that site’s Art Beast page.

blakegopnik:

DAILY PIC:  These are tight croppings from “Doors, Ponte City” and “Windows, Ponte City”, by Mikhael Subotzky and Patrick Waterhouse, now in  the International Center of Photography’s latest triennial, which previewed today. Curators are calling the show “A Different Kind of Order” – referencing the collapsing verities of photographic art, and of the worlds it points to. The triennial gives an excellent overview of the vast range of “lens-based” work being made today, from “straight” views of people living with the world’s rising waters (by Gideon Mendel) to distinctly arty, hand-made objects that use photos as art supplies (by art-world regulars Wangechi Mutu and Huma Bhabha). In between are projects like “Ponte City”, which is based in photography’s ability to document the world but doesn’t simply take it for granted. Subotzky and Waterhouse made a close study of a residential tower in Johannesburg, designed for white South Africans under Apartheid but now occupied by the country’s majority, and they present their images as lightboxes that recreate, in miniature, the tower itself.

Other standouts in the show include A.K. Burns (with reperformances of ultra-esoteric YouTube porn) and Rabih Mroue (whose video about death-by-sniper was a gem of the last Documenta).

For a full visual survey of past Daily Pics visit blakegopnik.com/archive. The Daily Pic can also be found at the bottom of the home page of thedailybeast.com, and on that site’s Art Beast page.

I love Joan Snyder. Happy to see a compilation of her work. Many more images at cavetocanvas.
cavetocanvas: Joan Snyder, Smashed Strokes Hope, 1971

I love Joan Snyder. Happy to see a compilation of her work. Many more images at cavetocanvas.

cavetocanvasJoan Snyder, Smashed Strokes Hope, 1971

dcdocent:

Reposting this from flavorpill: Powerfully Evocative Portraits of Four Sisters Photographed Over 30 Years.
I remember seeing some of these photographs by Nicholas Nixon in 2005 at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography as part of the exhibit How Photography Changed People’s Viewpoint (Part 4. CHAOS Our time, and Our future). I still have the Japanese-language catalog from the show, which besides these photographs, was pretty brilliant with some of the best American, European and Japanese photographers of the 20th century.

dcdocent:

Reposting this from flavorpill: Powerfully Evocative Portraits of Four Sisters Photographed Over 30 Years.

I remember seeing some of these photographs by Nicholas Nixon in 2005 at the Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Photography as part of the exhibit How Photography Changed People’s Viewpoint (Part 4. CHAOS Our time, and Our future). I still have the Japanese-language catalog from the show, which besides these photographs, was pretty brilliant with some of the best American, European and Japanese photographers of the 20th century.

(Source: flavorpill)

kaajoo:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places

Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.

(via everydayfrustone)

devidsketchbook:

CONCURS DE CASTELLS - PHOTOGRAPHER DAVID OLIETE

(Concurs de Castells | Tarraco Arena Plaça, Tarragona)

David Oliete (flickr) - Born in Tarragona, lived in Cardiff and Barcelona. Currently based in his hometown but available for assignments anywhere. Loves travelling, journalism, the mountains, his grandfather’s fishing rods and chocolate donuts.

(via everydayfrustone)